Synopsis:

   Jay is a 17-year-old Métis (Native Indian mother and white father) teenager, who was raised by his mother and assorted live-in boy friends in an isolated dysfunctional setting. He steals enough money to escape by bus from his desolate life to search for a meaningful life, and possibly search for his biological father.

    On the bus, a middle-aged man, Phil, befriends Jay and makes room for him in his apartment with him. Phil is despondent over the recent death of his nephew from a drug overdose administrated by his friends to precipitate his imminent death from AIDS.

    Phil introduces Jay to some of the niceties of modern civilization including his flamboyantly gay friend, Steve, and a couple of girls. Jay gradually becomes part of a small teenage group which includes a petty thief and the two girls. They initiate him into typical big city subcultures and entertainments with their numerous potential pitfalls and problems.  Jay eventually becomes less naive, overcomes his homophobia, and reluctantly accepts Steve as a friend who is his best man at is wedding.   Jay's petty thief friend puts him in contact with a smalltime drug dealer who uses him to deliver drugs.
   
    Jay spends some on the street until he finds work as a bus boy and waiter in a seedy restaurant. He lives in a small room above the restaurant. He meets an old native shaman who awakens Jay's feelings and acceptance for his native heritage and spirituality.

    Jay falls in love with a girl whose rich father actively does not approve of the relationship. However, they persevere and eventually are married at her father’s posh Country Club.  Jay's native shaman friend assists in the ceremony and entertainment is provided on the lawn outside the Club by native drummers and dancers in ceremonial costumes, much to the bewilderment of the father-in-law and strait-laced guests.

              ABOUT THE AUTHOR

I am the Canadian-born author of a two-volume fictionalized biography ("Spirits of a Feather" and "Souls of a Feather") of a young Métis man I met when he was 17 years old.  These two books, on which my screenplay is based,  document the several years I shared his experiences as he fought his way to survive and create a life for himself in the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba.  The young man is of mixed blood (Anglo-Saxon and Ojibway).  A significant part of the script deals with his First Nations background and culture.
The script has a minimum of location changes within one city and could be easily modified to take place in any large city in Canada or the U.S.A.  The script does not include profanity or gratuitous sex and is suitable for any age audience. Because it is reality based, careful type-casting could reduce the need for highly skilled actors and elaborate sets.

Personal Message:

I am the Canadian-born author of a two-volume fictionalized biography ("Spirits of a Feather" and "Souls of a Feather") of a young Métis man I met when he was 17 years old.  These two books, on which my screenplay is based,  document the several years I shared his experiences as he fought his way to survive and create a life for himself in the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba.  The young man is of mixed blood (Anglo-Saxon and Ojibway).  A significant part of the script deals with his First Nations background and culture.
The script has a minimum of location changes within one city and could be easily modified to take place in any large city in Canada or the U.S.A.  The script does not include profanity or gratuitous sex and is suitable for any age audience. Because it is reality based, careful type-casting could reduce the need for highly skilled actors and elaborate sets.



Logline:

Can a 17-year-old Métis boy from a disadvantaged family survive in a metropolitan city beset with gays, crime, drugs and poverty?  With perseverance, luck, and help from some friends, we see him succeed through his eyes.

ALABAMA CALLING
by
Charles  W. Shirriff